• Christianity - The Reformation | Britannica

    Christianity - Christianity - The Reformation: The next dramatic church division took place during the Reformation in the West in the 16th century. Like other schisms, this one does not yield to simple analysis or explanation. The Reformation was a mixture of …

  • Protestantism | Encyclopedia.com

    May 23, 2018· The Protestant emphasis on the family as the natural unit of social organization had a profound and persistent impact on the social culture of Protestant lands. In the first Reformation century Protestantism placed an obligation on the family to function as a sort of small church community, the head of the family instructing both children and ...

  • Constitutional Rights Foundation

    Martin Luther Encyclopedia Britannica's article on Luther. The Life of Martin Luther A timeline of Luther's life. A C T I V I T Y Two Kingdoms. Martin Luther did not draw a sharp line between his "Two Kingdoms" of church and state. In the United States, the First Amendment says that government "shall make no law respecting an establishment of ...

  • The Protestant Reformation - It's Origin & Significance in ...

    Feb 08, 2019· The Protestant Reformation inspired a "Counter-Reformation" within the Catholic Church. Beginning with Pope Paul III, the first pope of the Counter-Reformation, Catholic Church leaders met for three conferences of The Council of …

  • The First Amendment Encyclopedia

    First Amendment news, resources and expert opinion. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

  • Protestantism - Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica

    Origins of Protestantism. The name Protestant first appeared at the Diet of Speyer in 1529, when the Roman Catholic emperor of Germany, Charles V, rescinded the provision of the Diet of Speyer in 1526 that had allowed each ruler to choose whether to …

  • Topics | The First Amendment Encyclopedia

    Protestant Reformation. The Protestant Reformation appealed to the founders of America, and some of its concepts of individualism and free expression of religion are incorporated into... Red Scare. In two anti-Communist periods in the United States, known as Red Scares, First Amendment rights providing for free expression and free association ...

  • Lutheranism | Encyclopedia.com

    LUTHERANISM. LUTHERANISM. Among all the major individual varieties of Latin Christianity to emerge from the Reformation, Lutheranism stands alone for two reasons. In the first place, it bears the name of an individual. Secondly, its hallmark, more vital even than the reference to Martin Luther (1483 – 1546), consists of its formal, agreed-upon confessions of faith, in particular the ...

  • Articles | The First Amendment Encyclopedia

    This is an alphabetical listing of all articles in The First Amendment Encyclopedia. For more information, see About the First Amendment Encyclopedia.. 2 Live Crew. A Florida court said 2 Live Crew's rap lyrics were obscene, but a circuit court reversed the decision, saying the music was protected by the First Amendment...

  • Protestant Reformation | The First Amendment Encyclopedia

    Sometimes called the Protestant revolution, the Reformation appealed to the founders of the United States, and some of its concepts of individualism and free expression of religion are incorporated into the First Amendment.The Reformation generally is recognized to have begun in 1517, when Martin Luther (1483–1546), a German monk and ...

  • History of religious pluralism - Wikipedia

    The Reformation resulted in a weakening of the power of the papacy, which was unable to control the spread of information such as Luther's Ninety-five theses.Although Jan Huss was burned at the stake in 1415, Luther's enemies were unable to do the same …

  • Protestant Reformers - Wikipedia

    Protestant Reformers were those theologians whose careers, works and actions brought about the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century.. In the context of the Reformation, Martin Luther was the first reformer (sharing his views publicly in …

  • Reformations in Eastern Europe: Protestant, Catholic, and ...

    The Reformation first came to Poland-Lithuania in its Lutheran form soon after 1517, finding sympathizers among the German burghers in the cities of Royal Prussia. Source for information on Reformations in Eastern Europe: Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox: Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World dictionary.

  • 1850-1877: Religion: Overview | Encyclopedia.com

    According to the First Amendment to the Constitution, ... Encyclopedia.com. (April 15, 2021). ... a letter" (1573) Reprinted in The Protestant Reformation Edited by Hans J. Hillerbrand Published… About this article 1850-1877: Religion: Overview. Updated About encyclopedia.com content Print Article . You Might Also Like.

  • Protestant Reformation - The Encyclopedia of Mormonism

    May 27, 2011· Thus, the Protestant Reformation initiated a return to pure Christianity, a work that could not be completed without divine revelation and restoration. The leaders of the Reformation are honored as inspired men who made important progress, but without direct revelation they could not recover the true gospel or the priesthood authority to act in ...

  • Baptist - Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica

    Baptist, member of a group of Protestant Christians who share the basic beliefs of most Protestants but who insist that only believers should be baptized and that it should be done by immersion rather than by the sprinkling or pouring of water. Learn more about …

  • The Reformation - HISTORY

    Origins. Protestants generally trace to the 16th century their separation from the Catholic Church. Mainstream Protestantism began with the Magisterial Reformation, so called because it received support from the magistrates (that is, the civil authorities).The Radical Reformation, had no state sponsorship.Older Protestant churches, such as the Unitas Fratrum (Unity of the Brethren), Moravian ...

  • Germany - The Reformation - Encyclopedia Britannica

    The Reformation of Germany. The Reformation presents the historian with an acute instance of the general problem of scholarly interpretation—namely, whether events are shaped primarily by individuals or by the net of historical circumstances enmeshing them. The phenomenon that became the Protestant Reformation …

  • Chronology | The First Amendment Encyclopedia

    This is a First Amendment chronology compiled as part of The First Amendment Encyclopedia and includes key dates and events related to the development of the principles of individual liberties contained in the First Amendment -- covering freedom of speech and religion, separation of church and state, a free press and rights to assemble and petition the government.

  • Reformation | History, Summary, & Reformers | Britannica

    The Reformation movement within Germany diversified almost immediately, and other reform impulses arose independently of Luther. Huldrych Zwingli built a Christian theocracy in Zürich in which church and state joined for the service of God. Zwingli agreed with Luther in the centrality of the doctrine of justification by faith, but he espoused a different understanding of the Holy Communion.

  • Reformation - Wikipedia

    The Reformation (alternatively named the Protestant Reformation or the European Reformation) was a major movement within Western Christianity in 16th-century Europe that posed a religious and political challenge to the Catholic Church and in particular …

  • : The Religious Roots of the First Amendment ...

    In The Religious Roots of the First Amendment, Nicholas P. Miller does not seek to dislodge that interpretation but to augment and enrich it by recovering its cultural and discursive religious contexts--specifically the discourse of Protestant …

  • Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica

    Mary Wollstonecraft, the English writer and advocate for women's equality, was born on April 27, 1759, in London. She outlined her beliefs in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, one of the trailblazing works of feminism.Published in 1792, it argues that the …

  • Reformation | Encyclopedia.com

    Roger Williams (1604?–1683) was born in London, England, and earned a degree from Pembroke College, Cambridge, in 1627. After studying theology, he worked briefly as a chaplain before embracing Puritanism.. As a separatist, Williams believed that the Church of England was beyond redemption, and he refused advancement within it.

  • Reformation | History, Summary, & Reformers | Britannica

    The Reformation movement within Germany diversified almost immediately, and other reform impulses arose independently of Luther. Huldrych Zwingli built a Christian theocracy in Zürich in which church and state joined for the service of God. Zwingli …

  • The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation: Hillerbrand ...

    The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation is the first major reference to cover the immense subject of the Reformation in its entirety. Setting the issues of theology and …

  • The Sixteenth Century | Encyclopedia.com

    The Protestant Reformation. One of the forces that had united Europe throughout the Middle Ages was the religious unity provided by the Roman Catholic Church. That unity crumbled in the fifteenth and especially the sixteenth century, and this collapse actually contributed to …

  • Protestant Reformation - Simple English Wikipedia, the ...

    The Protestant Reformation was a series of events that happened in the 16th century in the Christian Church. Because of corruption in the Catholic Church, some people saw that the way it worked needed to change. People like Erasmus, Huldrych Zwingli, Martin Luther and John Calvin saw the corruption and tried to stop it. This led to a split in the church, into Catholics and various Protestant ...

  • History of religion in the United States - Wikipedia

    However, the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1791, has played a central role in defining the relationship of the federal government to the free exercise of religion, and to the prohibition of the establishment of an official church. Its policies were extended to cover state governments in the 1940s.